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The Happy Trails Highway™
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AUCTION: July 14 & 15, 2010
Roy Rogers Dale Evans Museum items

Trigger, sold for $266,500.00, at Christie's Auction House in New York.
Trigger, sold for $266,500.00, at Christie's Auction House in New York.



AUCTION INFO for the Roy Rogers Dale Evans Museum items.
˜”*°•♥Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ♥•°*”˜
There IS a Link at the bottom of this page for
Christie's Auction House in New York.
˜”*°•♥Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ♥•°*”˜

ALL of the Sales shown below,
have NOT had the Taxes or
Commission Fees
taken out yet!

The museum opened in Branson 2003.
Closed 12/12/2009.

Trigger was in Lot 38, Sale 2332,
New York, Rockefeller Plaza
TRIGGER (1934-1965)
estimate $100,000 - $200,000
Track Lot 38
Lot 342, Sale 2332
SOLD for: $266,500.00
BUYER: RFD-TV
SEE full story below about Trigger.
July 14, 2010

Let's SET the record Straight now.
NONE of the animals in the
Roy Rogers Dale Evans Rogers Museum
were stuffed! NEVER!
The news media gets it wrong all the time!
Trigger, & the other animals in the museum, were only mounted.
Roy did not have the heart to bury his horses or dog. Please Remember this.
Thank you, Painted Pony


July 14, 2010 - SOLD...

Roy's 64 Pontiac Bonneville car: $254,500.00
RFD-TV won the bid for Roy's car.

Roy's sterling silver belt buckle: $4,375.00
Roy's engraved money clip: $8,750.00


The Roy Rogers Museum sign: $3,764.00
The complete sign that hung outside the Apple Valley Museum and then on the interior of the Branson Museum.


LIFE magazine with Roy on Trigger: $1,375.00
With Roy on a rearing Trigger dated July 12, 1943, features one of the two Bohlin saddles on Trigger.

This is your life TV show book: $10,000.00
Photo of Roy, Trigger & Bullet: $6,875.00
Group baseballs, signed: $3,750.00
Group baseball bats, signed: $2,750.00

Roy's silver saddle: $386,500.00
Model of original
Roy Rogers Dale Evans Museum: $688
A Pony Cart used by Rogers family: $813
Four movie posters: $3,750
Group of Walk of Fame Stars: $2,500
The Roy Rogers Show, lot 17: $1,625
Roy Rogers Director Chair used in
last movie he made: $11,250
Nudie outfit for Roy Rogers: $10,625
Yellow Rose of Texas boots: $10,625

#27
Blue Plastic saddle: $22,500
The All Western Saddle Company produced about 65 of these. Only 37 have been located. Cowboy legend, Roy Rogers, was both a promoter and collector of the novelty saddles - frequently riding his flashy and unique plastic saddles in the annual Pasadena Rose Parade.

Tournament of Roses Parade Memorabilia: $1,000


Sons of the Pioneers, lot 27: $1,125
A collection of images documenting the band individually and as a group throughout their years together including a large tinted photograph of the group; accompanied by a plaque from the Western Music Association A Special Tribute to Roy Rogers as founding member of the West's greatest singing group, the celebrated Sons of the Pioneers, 1994 (26).

Buckaroo wood cutout wall decor
of Roy on Trigger: $3,750
Roy on Trigger resin: $2,000


TRIGGER'S ROAD APPLES: $3,000
Items made from Trigger's dried byproducts.
Collection of Roy & Dale merchandise: $1,125
Cincinnati Reds plaque: $1,750

Trigger: $266,500.00
Christie's says Rogers' faithful companion was bought by RFD-TV in Omaha, Neb., at an auction Wednesday of items from the now-closed Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Museum in Branson, Mo.
The television network's chief financial officer says Rogers reflects the company's values. The station calls itself
"Rural America's Most Important Network."
RFD-TV owner Patrick Gottsch said the Omaha, Neb.-based network will begin airing old Roy Rogers movies on Saturdays starting November 6. The movie cowboy's son, Roy Jr., will introduce each film, as Trigger and Bullet stand in the background. CFO Steve Campione says the company hopes to start its own museum. He says the company is looking to buy more Rogers items at auction. "The goal is to introduce Roy Rogers to a whole new generation of kids," Gottsch said.
They also have the RFD Theatre in Branson.
(former Ray Steven's Theatre).

The auction ended for Wednesday.
It continued Thurs, July 15 at 10 AM.

Buttermilk is Lot 230.
Trigger Jr. is Lot 343.
and Bullet is Lot 231.

Christie's auction continued Thurs, 10 AM.

July 15, 2010 - SOLD...
Wood Replica of ROY'S first home: $400
A Bell: $800
GROUP of EARLY Photographs
of Roy Rogers: $22,500


THIS IS YOUR LIFE, Bracelet 1953: $20,000
Presented to Dale during the This is Your Life Show. Featuring charms from the couples life together including charms of Roy's old school house in Ohio, a wedding charm engraved DE/RR Dec 31, 1947, a gold book with five of the children's names inside, a family charm with birthstones and a This is Your Life charm dated Jan 14, 1953, among others.

GOLD Charm Bracelet: $2500
STERLING SILVER HEART Perfume Flask: $9,000
DALE EVANS, Depicted in a glamorous pose: $3,750
(an oil painting signed J H Corbin, framed)
GOLD CRUCIFIX PENDANT: $1250
GOLD WATCH: $5250
Belonging to Dale encrusted with rubies and a central diamond cover with a flat linked gold band
DALE EVANS EARLY HISTORY: $2,500


Early Married Life with ROY and DALE Photo Coll: $1,250

DALE EVANS EARLY CAREER: $875
Group of Three Awards: $2,000
TWO Metallic HORSES, inscribed: $1,750
Group of WESTERN MUSIC AWARD PLAQUES: $1,250
Two bronze sculptures of Roy and Trigger, inscribed: $4,000
TIFFANY SILVER PRESENTATION BOWL,inscribed: $5,000
WESTERN MUSIC ASSOCIATION HALL OF FAME: $1,875
(Induction plaque presented to Roy, 1989; and a Dale Evans induction plaque, 1989; together with an SESAC Award, 1970 for Multimedia Country and Western Excellence, and 6 images).

GROUP of Eight AWARD PLAQUES: $688
GROUP of AWARDS and TROPHIES: $625
FOUR COUNTY of LOS ANGELES PLAQUES: $688
GROUP of Eight AWARDS: $813
PAIR OF COWBOY SPIRIT AWARDS: $6,875
(One to Roy, 1992. One to Dale, 1995).
GROUP of Five AWARDS to Dale: $563
Roy Rogers brand of KID'S Clothes, 15: $1,250
TRIGGER RUG: $2,250


GROUP of 3 Wooden HORSES: $2,000
(For kids to ride on).

Lot 65, ROY ROGERS and DALE EVANS MERCHANDISING coll: $875
COLLECTION OF ROY ROGERS and DALE EVANS VINTAGE MERCHANDISE coll: $1,875


TWO Framed CHILDREN'S COWBOY and COWGIRL ENSEMBLES: $3,500
(The Cowboy outfit was a donated item from me)!

ROY ROGERS VINTAGE TOYS and MERCHANDISING: $2,000
Large DISPLAY CABINET: $1,250
ELECTRIFIED R: $1,250

A PAIR of BLACK LAQUER Name/DESK PLAQUES: $1,250
(inscribed in mother-of-pearl with exotic birds).
GROUP of LAW ENFORCEMENT PATCHES: $375
PAIR of DEPUTY SHERIFF BADGES: $2,125
ROY'S BOWLING COLLECTION: $625
(Comprising a pearl silver bowling ball inscribed Roy Rogers Columbia 300 on stand, 1979 Roy's score card).
ROY'S BOWLING COLLECTION: $625
(Comprising an AMF blue Strikeline ball, with Roy Rogers; five bowling league patches; a wrist support band; a pair of white leather bowling shoes; accompanied by a color photograph of Roy's Victorville Tri Tavern Team 5).
GROUP of Roy's FIVE BOWLING SHIRTS: $375


TWO WROUGHT IRON WALL MEDALLIONS: $11,250

DALE'S SILK SCARVES: $1,625
Neck SCARVES, 22: $2,000
A pink gabardine ensemble made by Nudie for Dale: $7,500
A pink and turquoise gabardine ensemble made by Nudie for Roy: $6,250

A burnt orange gabardine lace-up shirt made by

Nudie for Roy: $11,250

RODEO BEN NUDIE THE RODEO TAILOR: $2,125
ROY'S 3 Western SHIRTS, pre 1963: $2,000
Two shirts made by Nudie, pre 1963: $2,125
THE WESTERN SADDLE MANUFACTURING COMPANY: $11,250
(1920s, pair of basket stamped billet batwing chaps belonging to Roy).


MIKE DILL BIT, lot 339: $15,000
(Curb bit with rearing Trigger
& the double RR on sides).

JOHN B STETSON, RANCHER-STYLE COWBOY HAT, BEAVER: $3,750
KELLY BROTHERS Spurs: $10,625
(pair of rare Kelly Bros Diamond Dick pattern spurs overlaid with Navajo silver and mounted with turquoise).
PAIR of CHILEAN SPURS: $2,000
(solid nickel with four-inch, sixty-point rowels)
FOUR PAIRS of ROY ROGERS BOOTS: $5,250
PAIR of HERCULES BRONZE SPURS: $1,000
A NUDIE canvas water bag trimmed with floral carved leather and Dale's name in individual silver lettering; together with a pair of Dale's chaps: $3,000
GUNBELT AND DOUBLE HOLSTER: $6,000
GROUP of 18th century SPURS: $625
PAIR OF NORTH & JUDD SPURS, 1930's: $4,750
TWO FRAMED WELLS FARGO ARTIFACTS: $3,000
THE SHOOTING GALLERY: $27,500

THREE CHANDELIERS: $17,500
THREE CHANDELIERS: $20,000
THREE CHANDELIERS: $6,875

(This is just one of the different styes of chandeliers that hung in the museum).
Large CHANDELIER: $9,375
Two CHANDELIERS: $12,500

A COLLECTION of DALE EVANS MERCHANDISE: $813
NATIONAL CASH REGISTER and SCALE: $4375
CHILD'S ROY ROGERS ENSEMBLE with RR toy Guitar: $3,500
GROUP of FOUR AUTOGRAPHED SPORTS MEMORABILIA: $688
BOBBY HULL Hockey Stick: $1,188
DON LARSEN MEMORABILIA: $2,500
JOHNNY BENCH and HARMON KILLEBREW MEMORABILIA: $1,375
GROUP of BASEBALL MEMORABILIA, Lot 115: $750
GROUP of BASEBALL MEMORABILIA, Lot 116: $500
MISS YELLOW JACKET: $1,500
(A model of Roy's classic speed boat).
COLLECTION of ROY ROGERS MERCHANDISE: $5,000
(Swiss Army Knives, 20).
TWO DAISY LIMITED EDITION BB GUNS, Lot 120: $3,750
ROY'S FISHING EQUIPMENT: $8,750
JOHN B STETSON, ROYAL-STYLE COWBOY HAT, WHITE BEAVER: $6,000
ENTERTAINING THE TROOPS Coll: $938
GROUP of SIX HUMANITARIAN AWARDS: $563
Six PRESIDENTIAL and POLITICAL CORRESPONDENCE: $3,250
(Addressing Roy and Dale, including a letter from Richard Nixon dated January 12, 1956).
RODEO BEN ensemble belonging to Roy: $4,375
PRESIDENTIAL MEMORABILIA: $2,500
Group of 3 political letters: $938
PAIR of ROY'S BOOTS: $6,250
ROY'S FLIGHT JACKET: $7,500
Will Ghormley, oval hand tooled leather relief portrait of Dale and Roy in front of an American Flag: $1,250
Presidential inauguration correspondence: $5,625
ROY ROGERS framed portrait: $2,750
ROY AND TRIGGER, Depicting a rearing Roy and Trigger; oil on canvas signed Gina Faulk, framed: $4,375
THE ROGERS CHILDREN, collection of black and white photographs,32: $1,063

EARLY LIFE WITH DUSTY and LINDA Photos: $750


THE ROGERS FAMILY DINING ROOM: $5,625
(the round dining table that the family would gather around, complete with chairs, rug and hanging wheel chandelier; together with two pictures of four, a family photo and a bell).

THE ROGERS FAMILY DINING SET: $11,875
(Comprising a nearly complete Wallace china set in the Westward Ho pattern; together with serving platters and silverware).

CORNER CURIO CABINET: Withdrawn from auction!
(From the Rogers family dining room; together with two wall mounted shelves).

THE KING OF KINGS HOLY BIBLE: $8,750
(With a gold cover embossed Roy & Dale Rogers on the cover, includes a stand).
AN OMEGA WATCH: $3,000
Six watches: $1,500
Silver-Gold wrist watch: $6,875
Group of five cocktail wrist watches: $1,125
A GROUP of THREE LARGE POCKET WATCHES: $1,000
Group 9 Pocket Watches: $1,500
Group of eleven pocket watches: $2,250
Group of five pocket watches: $1,500
Group of four pocket watches: $2,500

A brown polyester ensemble made by Nudie for Dale: $4,000


Dale's Nudie wardrobe: $1,875
(cowhide cropped vest with single closure, and laced up trim, labeled Nudie's Rodeo Tailors; an orange velvet vest with sequin foliage adorning the polyester sleeves, unlabeled; and a gold vest embellished with sequins, rhinestones and bugle beads, unlabeled 3).
THREE PAIRS of DALE'S SHOES/Boots: $5,250
THREE PAIRS OF ROY'S BOOTS,Lot 155: $2,750
THREE PAIRS OF ROY'S BOOTS, Lot 156: $7,500

ROY'S SHIRT: $2,375
(A brown pearl button-up, two pocket shirt featuring embroidered covered wagons on the yokes).
Roy's leather fringed shirt by Nudie: $4,375
(A cream colored gabardine lace-up shirt made by Nudie for Roy, featuring overlaid leather horseshoes on the yoke, collar and back, the shoulders and sleeves with white leather fringe with a single rhinestone on each fringe, a white leather overlaid horse head adorns the back, embellished with rhinestones throughout the yoke, collar, back, and pearl buttoned cuffs with the pre-1963 "topless" cowgirl label 3).
Nudie tailored pants for Roy: $2,000

Lot #167
AMERICAN EAGLE PLASTIC SADDLE: $50,000
(Produced and maker-marked by All Western Plastics headquartered in Lusk, Wyoming, this was unquestionably Roy's favorite, and most photographed plastic saddle. Manufactured in a very patriotic red, white, now more beige in color, and blue, with six stately red American eagles, a 15" seat, eight blue slotted conchos with plastic strings. 3/4" & 2" blue and white stars around the perimeter and blue engraved horn cap. The 24" long tapaderos adorned with the RR initials, stars and a single eagle. Includes matching breast collar, 4pcs).

THREE HARMONY ACOUSTIC FLATOP COMMEMORATIVE GUITARS
STYLE H1057 SINGING COWBOYS, 1951-1963; $6,250
(STYLE SILVERTONE 610 GENE AUTRY MELODY RANCH, 1941-1955; CHILDS GUITAR, SILVERTONE 600 ROY ROGERS, 1954-58, ALL ILLINOIS)

THE GRAMMY AWARDS: $2,000
(Including a gray and black lightening pattern tuxedo jacket by Manuel of California, labeled Designed for Roy Rogers, 1992).
PLASTIC RCA DOG MASCOT: $1,625
(Bearing the signatures of Marty Stuart, Jimmy Pickens, and Jack Palance among several others
37 in. high)
CF MARTIN AND COMPANY: $2,000
(A ROY ROGERS STYLE OM-45B, NAZARETH, PA).

TWO LARGE CANVASES: $2,000
(Oil on canvas, depicting Roy, Dale, Trigger and Bullet, the other depicting Roy, Dale, Gabby Hayes, Pat Brady and Andy Devine, by Cherokee
12 ft. x 4 ft).
PAT BRADY MEMORABILIA: $3,000
GABBY HAYES MEMORABILIA: $3,750
ROY'S SIDEKICKS: $1,188
ROY AND HIS PALS: $10,625


NELLYBELLE, 1946 Willys CJ-2A Jeep: $116,500
(One of the most memorable characters on the Roy Rogers TV show that ran from 1951 through 1957 was neither Roy, Dale, Trigger, Buttermilk or even Bullet - or for that matter even made of flesh and blood. It was a TV icon manufactured from good old American steel and named Nellybelle, a 1946 Willys CJ-2A Jeep with some very innovative bodywork. It was in fact owned by Roy, but was driven in the show by his comic sidekick, Pat Brady (1914-1972). Brady met Rogers while appearing as a bass guitarist in California in 1935, striking up a friendship with the young country & western singer who was a member of the popular group, The Sons of the Pioneers. When Len Slye was elevated to screen stardom as Roy Rogers, he recommended Brady as his replacement. However, as Bob Nolan, an original member of The Sons, was referred to as Bob, "Bob Brady" became "Pat Brady" joining the legendary singing group and appearing in a dozen films between 1938-51, including West of Cheyenne (1938), Man from Sundown (1939), The Durango Kid (1940), Song of Texas (1943), Bells of Coronado (1950), and South of Caliente (1951).

On TV, Pat Brady drove around Mineral City, the setting of the series, sweet talking to Nellybelle as if his verbal compliments could convince the recalcitrant jeep to get up and go. The name, which was painted on her doors in most episodes, apparently developed out of Pat riding an ornery mule in the earlier movies, and addressing it with phrases like "Whoa, Nelly!"

Roy Rogers chose to include a Jeep into the program because he noticed that after WWII, Jeeps were very popular, especially with children. Rogers himself owned a Jeep which he used for hunting, off road cruising and travel to and from his studio).

MACINTOSH AND T.J., complete costume from Roy's last fim: $4,750

TOM MIX Photo & Two stone figurines: $6,000
GROUP of PHOTOGRAPHS of ROY and HIS LEADING LADIES: $1,375
PHOTOGRAPHS of ROY AND FRIENDS: $8,125
GENE AUTRY art, 10-28-76: $1,750
BURT REYNOLDS, large framed photo: $750
A RESISTOL AUTOGRAPHED HAT: $8,750

CLARK GABLE: $8,750
(A director's chair of black canvas with white lettering and a wooden frame, inscribed Clark Gable on both sides of back rest; accompanied by a lasso).

PAIR of DOUBLE HOLSTERS: $3,500
THREE HIGHLY DETAILED WAGON MODELS: $1,625
FOLK ART CARVING: $563

TWO BOLO TIES: $4,375
ROY AND DALE WITH THEIR FAVORITE ANIMALS: $1,188
(A collection of photographs, toys and figurines reflecting Roy and Dale's love for their horses and dogs).
Pres. Reagan Awards 1998 &1999: $5,000
ROY AND DALE'S BOOTS, Lot 222: $4,375

UVALDE COUNTY CROWN: $3,250
(Given to Dale and inscribed on the inside Dale Evans Rogers Queen of the Uvalde County Centennial - May 10, 1956)
CHRISTMAS HAT & ORNAMENT: $1,750
DALE'S PUBLISHED LITERATURE: $2,000
Dales books that she wrote.


Blue silver outfit for Dale: $3,500


BUTTERMILK (1941-1972), Lot 230: $25,000
(Buttermilk was a young colt when he was rescued by a cattle farmer on his way to the slaughter house. The farmer bought him from a horse trader and he had been severely abused which resulted in a very unkind demeanor. The new owners quickly began to work with him, and through lots of dedication and care he eventually came around to become a friendly, affectionate and playful horse. His rescuers decided to name him.

After renaming the bubbly Quarter Horse Soda, Randall introduced Soda to Dale Evans because her movie horse Koko was too much to handle and also resembled Trigger too much. Dale fell in love with Soda and bought him immediately. He was renamed Buttermilk after Dale saw a cloud pattern in the sky that reminded her of the Hoagy Carmichael's song, "Ole Buttermilk Sky." Dale rode Buttermilk in almost all of Roy's movies and in all but six of The Roy Rogers Show television episodes that aired from 1951-57. A true Quarter Horse, Buttermilk displayed bursts of speed and could out run Trigger. On the set, Roy asked Dale to please hold Buttermilk back when riding along side of him since Trigger, always had to lead.en riding along side of him since Trigger always had to lead.

Buttermilk died at age 31 and was given the same treatment as his counterpart Trigger. His immortality now guaranteed for future generations, Buttermilk was put on display at the Roy Rogers-Dale Evans Museum in Victorville, eventually joining Bullet, Trigger, and Trigger Jr. at the museum's last home in Branson. MO)


BULLET, Lot 231: $35,000
Winning bidder was RFD-TV.
(Bullet was an AKA Registered German Shepherd originally given the name of "Bullet Von Berge". He was billed as the 'wonder dog,' and made his debut in the Roy Rogers film Spoiler's of the Plains in 1951, produced by Republic Pictures. Bullet was a regular on The Roy Rogers Show on NBC television from 1951-1957 and CBS from 1961-64. The big beautiful German Shepherd was the faithful companion of Roy and Dale and helped the duo maintain law and order in the western town of Mineral City where he was often filmed running alongside of Roy's horse Trigger.

In real life the German Shepherd that played Bullet had the same name, and was also the family pet owned by the show's married stars, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans. The Roy Rogers Show was an action-packed Western with plenty of things for a good, honest, dog like Bullet to do. Bullet was a master at knowing who the bad guys were, and always eager to bite a gun out of their hand or to tackle them when his human partners were outnumbered. He could run alongside Trigger and always keep up but also got to ride inside Pat Brady's Jeep, Nellybelle, on occasion. Bullet himself probably lost count of all the times he either led Roy & Dale to the villains or untied them when they had been caught by the bad guys).


DALE'S PARADE SADDLE: $104,500
(Red & white all plastic saddle).

GOLD, DIAMOND AND RUBY RING: $8,125
Masonic Pin: $750
Gold band ring: $2,000
Gold ring with Diamonds: $2,125
ROLEX SubMarianer Watch: $18,750
PRESENTATION KNIFE: $2,750
BOLO TIE, EDWARD H BOHLIN: $10,625
A COLLECTION OF CORRESPONDENCE: $6,250
DELUXE TRIGGER ORIGINAL WONDER HORSE: $2,500
TWO COOKIE JARS: $1,750


Man of the Moment, Roy Rogers: $2,000


SINGER SEWING MACHINE, Lot 297: $4,000
Together with a pair of early red, white & blue eagle boots. The bench was purchased by Roy and used by him in his Roy Rogers Ranger Post, a western wear store he opened, located in North Hollywood near Nudie's. He purchased it because it was the same as he had used as a youth while working his first job as a cobbler.

COBBLER'S EQUIPMENT, Lot 298: $4,375


EDWARD H. BOHLIN SADDLE ON TRIGGER JR.: $242,500
Edward H. Bohlin's "TAXIN" model black, floral carved silver and gold mounted parade saddle with three-dimensional gold rodeo scenes on the corners including bareback riders, bronc busters, bulldoggers, calf ropers and steerheads. Round figural horsehead conchos on the corners and around the perimeter. Let 'er buck cowboy on the silver horn. Long 25" tapaderos with a large central silver medallion and gold RR letters stacked just below. ROY ROGERS engraved onto the Bohlin seat plate. Stylized Cheyenne cantle with raised gold RR initials on the rear and a rope edge. Matching Bridle with square ferrule reins, massive Breast Collar and regal Hip Drops. This saddle was Roy's last and most ornate parade saddle. It was displayed on Trigger Jr. at the Branson museum.

The Roy Rogers Parade and Personal Appearance Saddle by James H. Nottage

As Roy Rogers gained both fame and fortune from movies and product endorsements, he continued to develop his personal wardrobe and the wardrobe and accessories for his horse Trigger. A special custom parade saddle was ordered at the shop of Edward H. Bohlin sometime around 1949. This saddle with matching bridle, hip drops, breast collar, and red and white wool corona was used on both Trigger and Trigger Jr., and is evident on the covers of Roy Rogers comics and in public stills from personal appearances. The manufacturer called it the "Taxin" and prominently advertised it in the 1949 catalog. The outfit is mounted overall with beautifully engraved sterling silver with horse heads on all the conchos and rope edges on all the different fixtures. On the long, graceful tapaderos, the corners of the skirts and jockeys, and on the horn and elsewhere there are solid gold figures of cowboys on bucking horses, calf ropers, steer wrestling, bull riders, and steer heads. This is the ultimate in horse gear for one of the most famous of silver screen cowboys, a fine example of the best of silver equipment from the famed shop of Edward H. Bohlin, and a highly significant part of the life of perhaps the greatest film horse of all time.
(Founding Autry Museum Curator and Bohlin expert, James Nottage is author of Saddlemaker to the Stars, The Leather and Silver Art of Edward H. Bohlin)


Trigger Jr, Lot 343: $18,750
TRIGGER JR. (1941-1969)
The original Trigger is said to be a cross between a Walking Horse and a Thoroughbred, but in reality Trigger Jr. was a full-blooded Tennessee Walking Horse named Allen's Gold Zephyr who was bred by C. O. Barker of Readyville, Tennessee. He was registered TWHBEA (#431975) and PHBA (#4055) with records indicating that he was foaled on January 1st, 1941.

Paul K. Fisher of Souderton, Pennsylvania, who claimed to be the world's largest breeder and dealer in yellow horses, sold Trigger Jr. to Roy Rogers in 1948 when he was still registered as Allen's Gold Zephyr. His sire was Barker's Moonbeam (#380497) and his dam was Fisher's Gray Maud (#420776). Fisher often took his horses to the Madison Square Garden Rodeo to show or sell and Roy stated that it took him six years to buy Trigger Jr.-finally succeeding after Fisher was forced into a well publicized dispersal sale in 1947. Trigger Jr. had beautiful conformation and a very stylish way of going. He was perfectly schooled and could accomplish a variety of difficult tricks including high stepping dances - always a crowd pleaser on Roy's national tours and the perfect protege to Trigger.


HAPPY TRAILS TO YOU, Lot 346:$27,500
The hand drawn music and lyrics to Happy Trails.

~”*°•♥Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ♥•°*”˜
Lot Description
TRIGGER (1934-1965)
Entertaining the masses so thoroughly for over two decades, Roy Rogers and Trigger were one of America's most recognizable duos, becoming instant classics in people's eyes, hearts and imaginations. Trigger also reached legendary status in his own right, and is undeniably one of the most memorable horses that ever lived.

"The Old Man" was foaled July 4, 1934 on a small ranch co-owned by Bing Crosby and was originally named for his breeder manager, Golden Cloud. On March 25, 1937, Golden Cloud, standing 15 hands high and registered with the Palomino Horse Association and Stud Book Registry, was sold to Hudkins Stables, a Hollywood provider of animals appearing on the silver screen. This was Golden Cloud's first prance into stardom and his early resume included roles such as Maid Marion's horse in the 1938 film The Adventures of Robin Hood where Olivia de Havilland famously rode sidesaddle.
In that same year, before filming began on Roy's latest film Under Western Stars, several of the stables that provided horses to Republic Studios brought their best lead horses so Roy could select a mount. It's been said that the third horse Roy got on was the handsome golden palomino, Golden Cloud, who handled so well and reacted swiftly to whatever was asked of him. Reportedly after riding the horse just 100 yards, Roy never looked at another, and purchased Golden Cloud on a time payment plan for the amazing sum of $2,500. As Roy recalled, "He would turn on a dime and he'd give you 9 cents change."
Trigger, a handle affixed to the animal once under Roy's ownership, was a name credited to Roy's sidekick Smiley Burnette who upon seeing the horse running, commented on how quick on the trigger he was. Roy agreed and decided that Trigger was the perfect name.
Amazingly, Roy never used his reins, never a whip, and never his spurs. Trigger had been trained to respond to touch and hand movements so with just a gentle pat on his neck, Roy would let him know just what he wanted him to do. They worked so in step with one another that it seemed as though Trigger instinctively knew just what to do and how to please the crowds. Roy once said of Trigger that he "seemed to know when people were watching him and that he recognized applause and just ate it up like a ham!"
Already a famous pair, Trigger accompanied Roy on his 1938 personal appearance tour stopping in almost every major city in the U.S. over a three month period. As Trigger's career progressed in show business, he became known as "The Smartest Horse in the Movies," performing some 100 recognizable tricks: Counting, doing the hula, untying ropes, shooting a gun, knocking on doors and walking on his hind quarters. The horse was outfitted with an exquisite Edward H. Bohlin gold and silver saddle and was even the focus of the movie My Pal Trigger where Rogers' Character gives the name "Trigger" to a new born colt. Trigger also appeared in the Republic Films sequel Trigger, Jr. and in all of Roy Rogers 188 movies and the Roy Rogers Show on NBC from 1951 to 1957, garnering his very own fan club. The awards and accolades achieved by Trigger were second to none- He shared the spotlight with his pal Roy at Grauman's Chinese Theater in Hollywood on April 21, 1949 when both Trigger and Roy's hoof/foot prints were forever mounted in concrete. In 1953, Trigger won the P.A.T.S.Y. award (animal equivalent for the Oscar) for the Son of Paleface where he upstaged Bob Hope. He also won the 1958 Craven award.

Trigger was such an integral part of Roy's life both on and off the stage throughout the years. Together, they performed all over the country during World War II raising millions in the sale of bonds to aid the war effort. And it was Trigger that gave Roy his legs as he proposed to Dale Evans in Chicago during a performance.
On July 3, 1965 at the Rogers ranch in Hidden Valley, California, Trigger left this earth at the age of 30 (one day before he would turn 31), succumbing to old age. Reluctant to "put him in the ground," Roy was inspired by the animals on display in the Smithsonian. He decided to have Trigger mounted in his iconic rearing position on two legs and put on display at the Roy Rogers - Dale Evans Museum, then located in Victorville, California.
July 14, 2010


From Julie Rogers 7/12; "For those of you that are interested Dustin and Dusty is scheduled to be on Fox and Friends Monday morning on Fox News, NBC Nightly News Monday night on NBC, and then the Today Show on NBC, Tuesday morning. The news of Trigger being sold hit the AP this morning so I'm sure there will be more coverage, but this is what we know has been confirmed. Please keep Dusty and Dustin in your prayers as they are the ones that are going to be there to watch everything go up for auction. If you don't have anything kind to say about the situation, I kindly ask you to keep your mouth shut. This has been an excrutiating process and the words that are being plastered as"comments" on the different stories is extremely hurtful. Dusty has done everything within his power to keep the Museum open and keep the collection together."



It will be a bittersweet time. TRY to remember to watch these shows! They will be featured on the following programs to share with audiences a few reflections on the sale of the family's personal collection:

Bloomberg Radio Live, Friday, July 9, at 4:30pm EST.

FOX & FRIENDS on Monday, July 12, 7:40am EST.

Tuesday, July 13, a spot on The TODAY Show 7 - 9 am.
Dusty and his son, Dustin, will be on the Today Show on July 13th to talk about the auction in New York at Christie's on July 14 and 15th. This is to sell contents of the Roy Rogers Dale Evans Rogers Museum that was in MO.

Christie's auction, July 14 & 15, New York.

WATCH The Today Show July 13, 2010.
Roy Rogers, Jr, & Dustin Rogers will be on to talk about the auction to be held at Christy's in New York (on the 14th). This is the NBC Network
from 7 am to 9 am
on a Tuesday morning.
Don't miss it!


˜”*°•♥Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ♥•°*”˜
Sadly, this was meant to be.
We Pledge our support for the
Roy Rogers-Dale Evans Legacy!
˜”*°•♥Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ♥•°*”˜

Fox network is not airing this sale.
They said they had another pressing issue to air.



Special Announcement from Roy Rogers Jr.
Nov 2009

I have been personally agonizing over how to start this letter. I guess I will start by saying thank you. Thank you for the years of love, support, prayers and loyalty to the Rogers Family. You, the fans, and our Board of Directors, are the ones who have kept our family's museum going for over 42 years. It has been a wonderful ride. After millions of visitors and countless stories of what Roy and Dale have meant to you, the Board of Directors have voted to close our doors of the Museum at the end of 2009. This has not been an easy decision. Many very emotional and financial issues have been addressed by all of us, as you can well imagine.

The decision to close the Museum has come after two years of steady decline in visitors to the Museum. A lot of factors have made our decision for us. The economy for one, people are just not traveling as much. Dad's fans are getting older, and concerned about their retirement funds. Everyone is concerned about their future in this present economy. Secondly, with our high fiscal obligations we cannot continue to accumulate debt to keep the doors open.This situation is one I have not wanted to happen. Dad always said- “If the museum starts costing you money, then liquidate everything and move on.” Myself and my family have tried to hold together the Museum and collection for over 15 years, so it is very difficult to think that it will all be gone soon.

What will happen to Roy Rogers, Jr and his family? For those of you that have heard I am retiring, nothing could be farther from the truth. My company, Golden Stallion, and its show tribute to Roy and Dale, will continue. I plan on taking the show to another venue in Branson. We are looking for space now. The show will also be available to travel around the country and take the message of Roy and Dale wherever we travel. I feel that this country needs the message that Roy and Dale always put forth, not only in their professional lives, but in their private lives as well.

The Museum's last day of operation will be December 12th. We want everyone to have the opportunity to visit the Museum one last time to see the collection in its entirety. This will be your last chance to see Roy and Dale's collection. Tell your friends and encourage them to come, before we close. This will be your final chance!!

Please keep us in your thoughts and prayers. Remember, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans will live forever in our hearts and minds, and will continue to ride across the silver screen through their movies. Every time you think of Roy and Dale, that warm feeling you have always felt, will always return.

Watch our website for further announcements and special dates.

I leave you all with Dad's favorite saying- Good bye, Good luck, and may the good Lord take a likin' to ya! See you in Branson, or on the road.

Love to all of you!
Happy Trails.
Dusty and Family



NOTICE:


UPDATE: 2010
Roy Rogers, Jr, AKA Dusty, now has all new band members for The High Riders. His son, Dustin Rogers, has also joined the band. The group performs daily at Mickey Gilley's Theater in Branson MO. They are also taking shows on the road.

FOR SWEET MEMORIES...
Please Watch the video BELOW as Dusty take FANS on a TOUR of the Roy Rogers Dale Evans Museum.

May 5, 2010 UPDATE:
The TRIGGER STATUE is Returning Home
to APPLE VALLEY CA.
This is the huge horse outside that greeted visitors. (NOT the real Trigger that was displayed inside the museum).
This did NOT go to auction!
A deal was worked out with Bob Tensley of Apple Valley.


Like Father, Like Son
To America, they were one of the greatest country western duos of all time.To Dusty Rogers, they were simply “Mom and Dad.” Roy Rogers Jr., also known as “Dusty”, recently spoke with Cathy Elkies, Christie’s Director of Iconic Collections, about the upcoming sale of The Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Museum Collection. Dusty opened up about the enduring legacy of his parents, and shared stories about the Roy and Dale you didn’t see on the big screen…

Cathy Elkies: What was it like growing up as the son of Roy Rogers?
Dusty Rogers: When I was a kid, I was living everybody’s dream. People still come up to me and say, “When I was seven years old, I wanted to be you!” Early on, I didn’t know that my dad was any different – I thought everybody worked in the movie business, and grew up on movie sets. I went through a rebellious phase during my teens, and I suppose Dad and I drifted apart a bit during that time. A turning point occurred when he had his heart problems in the early 1970s and we thought we could lose him. His health improved but the experience brought the two of us closer together, and we were like best buddies from that point on. People tell me I have the same mannerisms as him. My voice is a little deeper, I sing baritone and Dad was a tenor. My son Dustin sounds just like his grandpa. Genes run deep in this pool!

With celebrity parents and nine children, I imagine you had some fascinating conversations around the family dining table that we’re offering in the sale.
My parents made family dinners a priority, and we spent hours around that table as children. It was made by George Montgomery, an actor and cowboy who worked in some of Dad’s pictures. He was married to Miss Dina Shore, the Big Band singer and actress. George was a talented woodworker, and he had seen that Mom and Dad had too many kids to fit around an average dinner table, so he built one especially for us. The best part was the Lazy Susan he installed at the center. Mom set all of the food on big plates in the middle, family style, and we’d turn it around, taking off whatever we wanted to eat.

The Roy Rogers and Dale Evans Museum closed its doors in December after over 40 years of operation. This was obviously a monumental decision.
It was the most difficult decision for our family to make. Dad acknowledged many years ago that if the museum ever became difficult to maintain after he died, then we should let it go. We thought we’d always be able to keep it open, but my dad, smart as he was, knew that some day his fans would get older and they would slowly become unable to travel to Missouri. With the economy the way it is, and visitor traffic slowing dramatically, the expenses of operating the museum eventually outweighed the profit. Without being able to break even, we simply couldn’t support it anymore.

That was an amazing thing that Roy said to you before he died. It has to give you a sense of relief to know it would be okay with him.
Yes, but it has still been a challenge. In that sense our family is no different from any other family in the country. When your parents pass on, you’re left to deal with their household, and ultimately, their legacies. You have all of these things that were personal to them, and what do you do with them? You’d love to save them, but you can’t possibly keep everything. You feel terrible about throwing things out, because they mean something to the family.

We’ve agreed that there are people out there who love Roy and Dale and would love the opportunity to have something personal to remember them by. If we give people an opportunity to do just that with this auction, then we’ve done our job as a family.

We have to talk about Roy and Trigger, possibly the most famous horse in show business. Was the Roy-Trigger relationship as close as the media made it out to be?
It really was. Dad and Trigger were both young when they started—Trigger was only four years old, and Dad was 26—and on some level I think they both felt this was the start of something special. Over their 30+ years together, they established a bond of trust and mutual respect. Once, when the show was passing through New York, the truck took a sharp corner, and the trailer carrying Trigger overturned, trapping him inside. Most horses would get so panicked in this situation that you’d have to put them down on the spot. But Trigger was different. Dad managed to reach in through the door of the trailer, through the broken glass, and put his hand on Trigger’s neck. He said, “It’s ok, old man, it’ll be ok.” The fire department came, and they were eventually able to slide Trigger out using the fire hose. He came out with just a few knocks and bruises—that’s all. That shows you the kind of trust they had.

When Trigger passed, my dad was so distraught he didn’t tell the family for over a year (we didn’t know, because he was kept in another stable off our ranch). I think to him it was like losing a child. He told my mom, “I can’t just put him in the ground.” He had Trigger beautifully mounted and installed in the museum. A lot of people were upset about that, but I think he made the right choice. Trigger was one of the most popular attractions at the museum.

Your father made a lot of smart choices during his career. When I look at the collection in our sale, all of the merchandising is amazing—lunch boxes, toys, guitars, and more. What I find incredible is that this was in an era when Disney was the only other large-scale merchandiser. How did your parents become some of the first to take advantage of this opportunity?
It all started in 1941, when Dad was playing a show in Madison Square Garden in New York City. A businessman approached him and said he wanted to put Roy’s name on children’s gun belts, hats, boots, and other toys. Well, Dad later agreed, and from there the business took off. Roy was second only to Disney in all those years of branded kids’ items. I think at one point there were more than 400 items with Dad’s name on them.

Where do you see evidence today of Roy and Dale’s legacy and their influence on American pop culture?
Their legacy lives in the generation of people who grew up watching them on the big screen. It is as simple as people telling me, “I never heard a bad thing about your parents.” Even though they were horrendously busy, managing up to 20 different businesses at a time, raising nine children, taking care of all of their employees, and being on the road 29 days out of 30—no matter how tired they were, they upheld the greatest moral integrity through it all. They taught all of us children wholesome values, and showed us that if you live right, the world will smile on you in return.

Let’s stroll thru a few of your favorite pieces in the upcoming auction…starting with the Bonneville Parade Car and trailer. How did Roy come to have it, and did he really use it?
The story begins with Nudie the Rodeo Tailor, who made all of my dad’s fancy cowboy clothes. Nudie had a wild sense of style— he wore a different pair of boots every day, but they would never match. He’d wear green on one foot, blue on the other. Starting in the early 1960s, Nudie started to work on cars—he’d take apart the interiors of Bonnevilles and rebuild them with every possible cowboy decoration you could want in a car. Turn signals and door handles were converted into guns, and silver dollars were embedded into the side walls and dash board. Nudie made Dad this special car and trailer so he could carry supplies when he went out on location. Dad drove that car everywhere—he took it hunting, fishing—there was no place he wouldn’t drive it. He also used it for some practical joking. There was an eight-track machine installed under the seat, and Dad kept it loaded with an eight-track of a cattle drive. He’d drive up to an intersection at a four-way stop, then project the sound of the eight-track through a bull horn he kept in the car. People nearby would hear this stampede going through and look around in confusion. He thought that was hilarious!

Nothing was too precious for your dad to use. Yet what’s remarkable to me about the Nudie clothes in the sale is that they were “work clothes” but their condition is fabulous!
Dad came from nothing, he grew up without two sticks to rub together as a boy. He finally got to the point where he could get some nice things and he had respect for them, he took good care of them.

One of my favorite items from Dale is the charm bracelet, it tells the whole story.
That bracelet was given to my mom in the early 1950s during the time that Ralph Edwards was doing a show about Dad’s life story, entitled, “This is Your Life.” It completely chronicled Dad’s life in gold charms—it has the school house where he was educated, a duck for Duck Run, where he grew up in Ohio, a pair of hands to signal their marriage, there’s a charm of Trigger rearing. Dad would add charms for every grandchild. It meant an awful lot to my mother, she was very proud of it. I hope to be able to explain to the winning bidder what each charm means.

You’ve really stepped into your dad’s boots with your musical show in Branson, Missouri, which you perform five times per week. How did you decide to follow in your parents’ footsteps?
I sang with Mom and Dad ever since I was a young boy on the road with them. I started my band, The High Riders, about 25 years ago. My mom actually gave us that name. We played local events with my parents here and there, and when they got older, and eventually passed, we started doing more and more on our own. What I want to represent in my singing career is the legacy of Mom and Dad. I pay tribute to them in my show, while also doing some music of my own.

As you said earlier, genes run deep in the Rogers family. I’ve seen photos of your son—he looks so much like Roy.
Yes, if it wasn’t for the goatee and the tattoo he’d look exactly like dad! I’m very proud of him. This year he’s handling more of the show than ever. I don’t know whether he’ll go in that direction— I won’t push him—if it fits, I’m sure he’ll do it, but if it doesn’t, that’s ok too. My father’s legacy touched the lives of so many Americans, and to see that legacy live on in my own son brings me a joy beyond words.
♥ Happy Trails♥





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Christian Search:

The Roy Rogers Auction at Christie's Auction House in New York. WATCH it online!
DUSTY takes FANS on a TOUR of the RR/DE Museum~ SUCH MEMORIES!!
Roy Rogers' 1964 Lincoln Continental paint job story as told by Dusty Rogers
Billy Long Auctions: Roy Rogers Museum contents - April 30th - Springfield, MO.
Brian Lebel's Old West Auction: Roy Rogers Museum contents - June 26th
High Noon: Roy Rogers Museum contents - Christy's: July 14th-15th
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